Phone : 979-217-1694

2920 Cain Road, College Station, Texas 77845

clickhere

Disease/Vaccine Q&A

DogCanine Rabies:

How would my pet acquire this disease?
Rabies is spread by the saliva of an infected animal. This disease can be spread through bite wounds, sharing community water bowls, etc. This disease attacks the central nervous system of an animal causing it to show neurological signs such as aggressive behavior, abnormal gait, hypersalivation and difficulty swallowing. This disease can also be zoonotic, which means it can be transmitted to humans.

Should I vaccinate my pet for Rabies?
Absolutely, no questions asked! It is very important to vaccinate your pets for this potentially fatal disease, and it’s the only vaccine required by law for small animals.

At what age can my pet receive this vaccination?
Your pet can receive this vaccine at 12 weeks old.

Canine Parvo Virus:

How would my pet acquire these diseases?
Canine Parvo Virus is the most fatal disease that young dogs die from. Parvo can be very difficult and costly to treat once one has acquired it. It can be spread to your pet in several ways. They can contract this disease by direct contact with an infected animal through feces, urine, and other bodily fluids. You can also obtain the virus on your own clothes, shoes, skin, etc. then which your dog can acquire it. This virus can live in the environment for up to a year and takes drastic measures to ensure that your pets environment and surroundings are free of this disease.

Should I vaccinate my pet for the Parvo virus?
YES! As puppies they need to have an initial vaccine plus 3 boosters of DHPP, which will provide protection against Parvo and other critical diseases. (Distemper, Hepatitis and Parainfluenza).

At what age can my pet receive this vaccination?
Your pet can receive their initial vaccine at 6-8 weeks old then every 3-4 weeks after for the additional boosters (4 vaccines total). Your pet needs to receive all boosters to ensure they are fully protected from these fatal diseases.
Canine Bordetella Bronchiseptica: aka “Kennel Cough”

How would my pet acquire this disease?
Canine Bordetella Bronchiseptica is spread by direct contact or aerosols from infected animals. This disease is both a virus and a bacterial agent and causes an upper respiratory infection. It is commonly acquired in boarding facilities but is not limited to kennels. They can acquire “kennel cough” by direct contact at dog parks, grooming facilities or in your own home.

Should I vaccinate my pet for Bordetella Bronchiseptica?
It is strongly recommended to vaccinate your dog against this disease if your dog goes to the groomers, is frequently boarded or comes into contact with other dogs.

At what age can my pet receive this vaccination?
Your pet can receive this vaccine at 8-12 weeks old and will need one additional booster 3-4 weeks after their initial vaccine (2 vaccines total). Your pet needs to recieve all boosters to ensure they are fully protected. Our Bordetella vaccine is given annually.

Canine Leptospirosis: “Lepto”

How would my pet acquire this disease?
Leptospirosis is a bacterium that is spread through the urine of wildlife, including squirrels, raccoons, opossum, skunks, etc. If your dog swims or ingests water from contaminated areas, they are at risk of acquiring this disease. Those that acquire Lepto can experience kidney and liver failure and require lifelong treatment.

Should I vaccinate my pet for Leptospirosis?
If your family lives near bodies of water or has a high population of wildlife in your area, your pet should be vaccinated. This disease can also be zoonotic, which means it can be spread to humans.

At what age can my pet receive this vaccination?
Your pet can receive this vaccine at 12 weeks old and will need one additional booster 2-4 weeks later. Your pet needs to receive all boosters to ensure they are fully protected. Our Lepto vaccine is given annually.

Canine Influenza virus: “canine flu”

How would my pet acquire this disease?
Your pet could acquire this disease by coming into contact with respiratory secretions of an infected animal or contaminated objects. This disease has a higher rate of infection if your pet travels with you along the gulf coast.

Should I vaccinate my pet for canine influenza?
Depending on the region you live in and if your pet travels with you, you should definitely vaccinate your pet for the flu. Some boarding facilities along the gulf of Texas require this vaccine to board your pet.

At what age can my pet receive this vaccination?
Your pet can receive their initial vaccine at 12 weeks old then one booster 2-4 weeks after the initial vaccine (2 vaccines total). Your pet will need to receive the booster to ensure that your pet is fully protected from this disease.

Feline Rabies:

How would my pet acquire this disease?
Rabies is spread by the saliva of an infected animal. This disease can be spread through bite wounds, sharing community water bowls, etc. This disease attacks the central nervous system of an animal causing it to show neurological signs such as aggressive behavior, abnormal gait, hypersalivation and difficulty swallowing. This disease can also be zoonotic, which means it can be transmitted to humans.

Should I vaccinate my pet for Rabies?
Absolutely! It is very important to vaccinate your pets for this potentially fatal disease, and it’s the only vaccine required by law for small animals.

At what age can my pet receive this vaccination?
Your pet can receive their initial vaccine at 12 weeks old.

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus and Panleukopenia:

How would my pet acquire this disease?
These are diseases that cause upper respiratory infections in cats. They can be spread by direct contact or through aerosols of infected individuals.

Should I vaccinate my pet for FVRCP?
Definitely! As kittens they should be vaccinated for these diseases to build their immunity against them. If they are around other cats, they are at risk for contracting any of the diseases at any age.

At what age can my pet receive this vaccination?
Your kitten can receive their initial vaccine at 6-8 weeks old then every 3-4 weeks after for their additional boosters. (4 vaccines total) If you have a cat that is older than 16 weeks old and has never been vaccinated they can receive their initial vaccine then an additional booster 2-4 weeks later. (2 vaccines total) Your pet will need to receive all boosters to ensure that they are fully protected from these diseases.

Feline Leukemia Virus “FeLV”

How would my pet acquire this disease?
Feline Leukemia virus is spread by nasal secretions as well as saliva. The number one way the virus is spread is by sharing community water bowls with infected individuals.

Should I vaccinate my pet for FeLV?
If your cat is outdoors it is HIGHLY recommend that they be vaccinated for this virus. The chance of outdoor cats getting this virus is much higher due to the percentage of stray cats that are not properly vaccinated. Strictly indoor cats have a very low risk of getting this virus, therefore indoor only cats do not need to be vaccinated for feline leukemia.

At what age can my pet receive this vaccination?
Your kitten can receive their initial vaccine at 6-8 weeks old then every 3-4 weeks after for their additional boosters. (3 vaccines total). They will need to receive all boosters to ensure that they are fully protected from this disease.

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus “FIV”

How would my pet acquire this disease?
The number one way this disease is spread is through cat bites.

Should I vaccinate my pet for FIV?
It is not recommended. It is questionable whether or not the vaccine is safe, protective or effective. At Chasing Tails Mobile Veterinary Services, we do not offer this vaccine service.

How do I know if my cat is FIV positive?
The only way to tell if your cat is FIV positive or negative is to perform an antibody blood test. This test is done on site and will provide us with immediate results within 10 minutes.

Why should I have my cat tested?
Early detection will help you determine the wellbeing of your cat and will also allow you to prevent the spread of infection to other cats.

What do I do if my cat is FIV positive?
In comparison, FIV is the equivalent to HIV in humans. There is not much an owner can do for their cat if they are FIV positive. Most cats that are FIV positive will live their entire life with the virus and are usually relatively healthy. Unfortunately there is no vaccine or treatment against the virus.

Heartworm disease in dogs:

How do dogs get heartworms?

The heartworm life cycle is very complex. In a nutshell, a mosquito has to bite, or take a blood meal from a heartworm positive dog and ingest the microfilaria (juvenile heartworms). That same mosquito can land on your dog and inject the microfilaria into your dog’s blood stream. If your dog is not on heartworm prevention these juvenile heartworms can slowly mature into adult heartworms over a 6 month period and make their way into your dog’s heart. If your dog has adult heartworms living in their heart, this can cause several health issues, including death.

At what age can I have my dog tested for heartworms?
Good question! They can be tested for heartworm disease if they are older than 6 months of age. The reason they
cannot be tested sooner is due to the amount of time it takes for juvenile heartworms to mature to adult heartworms.

Why should I have my dog tested?
Your dog should be tested for heartworms yearly to ensure he is healthy and that the preventative is working correctly. If your dog is needing more prevention, it is required that your dog has an updated, negative heartworm test within the last year.

Can my other dog get heartworms directly from other heartworm positive dogs?
Not exactly. Heartworms are spread to dogs through a vector, which is the mosquito. The mosquito has to take a blood meal from a heartworm positive dog and ingest juvenile heartworms. The mosquito then has to inject those juvenile heartworms into a heartworm negative dog that is not on prevention. This is how they originally become infected.

What do I need to do to prevent further heartworm infections?
PREVENTION is the key. At a glance, heartworm testing and prevention may seem pricy, but in the long run it will save
you a large amount of money as well as your pet’s life. Heartworm prevention works by killing what your pet has been infected with in the last 30 days, so it is important that you do not miss a dose. Heartworm prevention is highly recommended year round and as a lifelong medication.

Is there a treatment for heartworm disease?
Fortunately there is treatment for heartworm disease but unfortunately it is very costly and can span over several months. If your dog is heartworm positive, treatment is highly recommended. Treatment can cost from hundreds to thousands of dollars whereas monthly heartworm prevention can cost anywhere from $5-10 a month to keep your dog healthy and free of heartworms. If your dog needs heartworm treatment, give us a call, we would be happy to give you an estimate 979-217-1694.

Where can I find more information about heartworm disease?
The most reputable source to find information about heartworm disease, prevention and treatment is HeartwormSociety.org. They will have several answers to questions that you may have.